We hear the expression “famous last words” all the time, right? It’s always interesting to learn what people said before they passed on to the other side.

Well if you want to laugh, cry, and be creeped out, check out what these 25 AskReddit users had to say about the extraordinary last words they heard while working in hospitals. Prepare to be moved!

1. Well Fuck You, Too

“Cardiac ICU: Had a gentleman who was DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) on comfort care. He was demented and was cursing like a sailor. He seemed to have moments of clarity and would ask to see his brothers (who were both passed).

After a particularly worrisome heart rhythm, he went back into a Sinus tachycardia and looked me in my eyes and said ‘Hey, whats your name?’

‘Kabc.’

‘What do you do here?’

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‘I’m a nurse.’ After this, he was quiet for some time… then he said…

‘Fuck you.’

And then he died about 20 minutes later.”

2. In Need Of Directions

“‘But I don’t know how to get there’…Grandpa in hospice. Hadn’t spoken in days. Died about 2 hours later.”

3. That Will Stay With You

“I work in a cardiac ICU. We had a patient who had a pulmonary artery rupture (a rare, but known complication of a Swan-Ganz catheter). One minute he was joking around with us and the next bright red blood was spewing out of his mouth. His last words before he died were ‘why is this happening to me?’ It still haunts me years later.”

4. So Sweet

“‘Get home safe, little one.’ It wasn’t what he said – he said the same thing to me any time I had him as a patient for the evening. It was how he said it. He gave me this look and pause like he knew. The DNR’s in my experience, always know when it’s time. It’s creepy.”

5. Favorite Patient

“I’m a nurse and was previously working at an assisted living community on the dementia/Alzheimer’s unit. My very favorite patient had been declining pretty steadily so I was checking on him very frequently. We would have long chats and joke around with each other, but in the last two weeks of his life, he stopped talking completely and didn’t really acknowledge conversation directed at him at all.

I finished my medication rounds for the evening and went to see him before I left. I told him I was leaving for the night and that I’d see him the following day, and he looked me in the eyes and smiled SO genuinely and said, ‘You look like an angel.’ I thought it was so sweet because he had not seemed lucid in weeks.

He died the next morning. It really messed with me.”