Our Solar System is a seriously beautiful place. Whether it’s the pockmarked volcanic surface of Mercury, the dusty crimson plains of Mars, the beautiful rings of Saturn, or even the blues and viridian of our own world, it’s a diverse place full of remarkable sights and natural wonders.

We’d be nowhere without the Sun, mind you, and a series of truly stunning visualizations of our local star – as seen from each planet, and poor demoted Pluto – by artist and illustrator Ron Miller serve to remind you of this fact. He’s spent more than 40 years illustrating the dark realms of space, both near and far, and has come up with the most realistic depictions of the Sun as seen from these far-flung worlds as possible.

“I’ve taken care in not only making sure the Sun is depicted realistically, but also the surfaces of the planets and satellites as well,” Miller told IFLScience.

Okay, let’s do this!

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Mercury, which is 36 million miles from the Sun.

Venus, which is 108 million kilometers (67 million miles) from the Sun. As depicted here, the planet is covered in pancake volcanism and a suffocating, carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere

Venus, which is 67 million miles from the Sun. As depicted here, the planet is covered in pancake volcanism and a suffocating, carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere.

Earth, which is 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) from the Sun. If you've ever seen a solar eclipse, this sight will be very familiar to you

Earth, which is 93 million miles from the Sun. If you’ve ever seen a solar eclipse, this sight will be very familiar to you.