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11 People Who Found a Loophole That Resulted in Serious Cash

We all dream about finding some hidden loophole that means we’re not as poor as we think, or that we can not worry so much about our bank accounts, or that we might be able to take that vacation after all, but for most of us, we’re never going to be that lucky.

These 10 people were, though, and here are their secrets, in case you were wondering how they did it – and you know you are!

11. Bravo, this is well done my friend.

I worked at a restaurant in a hotel where you could collect “employee bucks” of sorts for going above and beyond at your job. You could use them to pay for things like a room stay or food in the hotel restaurant. They were worth a dollar each, but you obviously couldn’t cash them in for real money.

I saved up about $450 worth, used $100 worth to pay for a hotel room on a day I was working, bought a soda from myself at the restaurant and tipped myself the extra ~$350 and signed it all to my room bill. Upon checkout it just shows that I spent $350 at the restaurant, not a breakdown of the bill. So then I used my employee bucks to pay off the hotel bill and got an extra $350 on my paycheck (minus taxes of course). Look_to_the_Stars

10. That person is the worst.

We had a situation at my old job (a huge, international company) where we’d work shifts, either 8/10/12 hours. Anything after 8 hours was overtime.

Sometimes we were scheduled for the next shift quite soon after the last one had ended, for example 05:00-12:00 and then 19:00-00:00.

Someone discovered that if there were less than 8 hours between shifts in a 24-hour period, anything after 8 hours total was paid the overtime rate.

We did it for ages and then in the context of some team chat, some twat asked one of the managers whether the above scheduling would still be feasible.

Turned out the management hadn’t even noticed and stopped it immediately. And back to minimum wage we went.

9. Milked the internet for all it’s worth.

Was on a cruise ship a few years ago that had a pay-per-minute Internet policy. You’d buy like 200 minutes of wifi access for $100 or whatever crazy price it was. They had a little portal that you went to, to start and stop the timer, and tell you how much time was remaining.

I quickly realized that the timer counted by whole minutes. That is, if I started at 12:00:01, and stopped it at 12:00:58, then it counted as 0 minutes of internet use.

For the entire cruise I took advantage of this. Start the timer, fire up your internet apps like Facebook and Instagram and let your timeline and emails download, or launch a website and let it load. Stop the timer. Browse your feed and photos and read your website and emails offline, compose posts and replies etc. Start the timer again to send/upload, stop it again within a minute.

I milked those 200 minutes for an entire 3 week cruise and still had 45 minutes left over at the end.

8. That’s a lot of potatoes!

Not me, but a friend of mine (among others I’d assume) managed to get an entire sales campaign cancelled that a bank in my country did.

IIRC the bank tried to promote one of their debit cards (which are basically prepaid credit cards) via some bonuses and gifts you’d get as customer, e.g. one of 20 products you can choose for free if you start using it etc.

One of these bonuses they offered was a small payback, you’d get after each purchase. What they did was basically rounding up the amount you paid (to full Euros) and give you the difference. So if you bought something for 27.63€ you’d get 37 cents gifted from this bank.

What he then did was only possible because we were university students back then, had very flexible work time and some of our friends were temping in super markets… he went to the super market our friends worked at at times when basically no one else was there and purchased hundreds of single potatoes. Each one = one purchase with the card. Depending on their weight each of these potatoes was like 2ct or 3ct, so for each purchase he got 98ct or 97ct gifted from the bank, making him profit about 94-96ct for each potato. He got about 250€ (plus an unreasonable amount of free potatoes) in 2 days with this until the bank called him like “uh… could you like maybe stop that…?” and he just shamelessly responded “why?” to which the bank person on the phone had no good answer. So then he just went on and made some more money until the whole incentive thing got completely cancelled a few days later.

Fun times.

7. Living rent-free is actually the loophole here.

Right out of college I worked a job that had a 100% match to any retirement contributions. I was young, lived rent free with my parents, Had no student debt, and could grab OT nearly every week. After some budgeting I figured I could throw 80% of my paycheck into retirement. I did so for 9 months until my supervisor called me into the office to sign a policy change that limited retirement contributions to 50%. I’d stashed away nearly $35,000 on about a ~$32,000 annual pay. I had no life for about a year, but damn if it didn’t jump start my retirement.

6. Kids are the best at finding loopholes.

When my brothers and I were 6-10 years old we found a crane candy game where you were “guaranteed to win” something. We found a laser sensor in the area where you pick up your prize. This indicated whether or not something had dropped. So, by holding the flap door open at the bottom the sensor was never triggered so for 25 cents we nearly emptied the machine. Thanks Red Robin!

5. I’m pretty sure this is why they went out of business.

Moviepass was $10 a month and you could use it to get 1 movie ticket a day. I lived next door to a Regal, and I went everyday because Regal would give their reward points for every ticket purchased. They didn’t care that Moviepass was paying for the tickets then giving them to me as part of my subscription. In 8 months I spent $80 on the subscription and saw everything that came out and I racked up enough Regal rewards points for about 50 free popcorns or drinks.

Moviepass went out of business but I still had all the Regal rewards.

4. I must have missed out on this one.

Early in the smartphone world there was an app that gave you points for watching TV shows and ads that you could turn in for gift cards or discount codes.

The rewards were not great but over time and by waiting for gift card restock you could make out like a bandit. However, the shows they wanted you to watch were not my cup of tea (a lot of prime time shows and reality shows) and I wasn’t home for a lot of them so I thought I was SOL. Turns out, the app had a grace period where if you had recorded the show on your TV you could still get credit, so I just pirated the shows and set my phone up to “watch” them while I did something else. Then I realized it only listened for about 2 minutes before it gave you credit so I was able to get through the log of shows in about 40 minutes and make a killing.

Because of that app I was able to get a kitchen aid stand mixer, a smoker and a bunch of other stuff because of the gift cards.

3. No one feels bad about scamming university parking, either.

In college there was a parking garage that charged around $2/hour. I couldn’t get a parking pass but learned the heated garage that charged $2/hour had a $20 fee for a lost ticket. I would park my car in there for a few weeks at a time and when I had to leave would lose my ticket and be forced to pay the $20 lost ticket fee.

A parking pass was around $500 to park outside and I ended up paying around $300 in lost ticket fees to park in the heated garage.

2. So many places forget to take the coupon.

I bought a card once for $10 that had 16 coupons for a BOGO pizza from Dominos. They were little stickers that you were supposed to pull off and hand in when using them, but they never asked for the stickers. They also didn’t have an expiration on them. They also didn’t tell anyone it was supposed to be one per order.

We’d order 8 pizzas at a time, used them for two years. Thousands of dollars of free pizza really help when you’re a broke college kid.

1. Wow, that’s a big one.

When I was at university, the pay-for campus printers all worked on a system where you’d print your documents, release them at the printer, they’d print, then after they’ve finished printing, it would then contact the server to get the cost deducted from your balance. That final step always took a while and I discovered in my first year that if I cancelled the print job as the final page was rolling out of the printer, it wouldn’t deduct the cost from my balance. With this method I got free printing for nearly two years before they upgraded the system!

I’m so jealous! Maybe one day it will happen to me, too.

Have you ever been in the right place at the right time? Tell us your story in the comments!