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15 Kids From Around the World Photographed With What They Eat in One Week

©Instagram,greggsegal

I’ve often wondered what kids around the globe eat. I’m assuming that a lot of countries have way more balanced and healthy diets than the United States, but you just never know.

That is why this project from photographer Gregg Segal is so interesting. Segal spent three years in nine different countries documenting what kids eat around the globe on a daily basis. The information is fascinating and the photos are beautiful as well.

Buy Segal’s book, Daily Bread: What Kids Eat Around the World, HERE and take a look at these great photos.

1. USA

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Prince, photographed in 2016 for Daily Bread. When he was 12, Prince and his family left St. James Montego Bay for the U.S. His parents decided life in Jamaica was too dangerous after Prince’s cousin was gunned down at the little neighborhood market his family owned. Prince misses the green open space of his family farm and the animals they raised: goats, chickens, geese, rabbits, pigs and cows. They grew and harvested corn, yams, coconut, oranges, apples, pears, ackee and breadfruit – and back then his diet was much better than it is now. Prince misses his dad, too, who’s stuck in Montego Bay driving a cab. He prays he’ll get his papers and come to America. #dailybread #powerhousebooks #culture #americandream #whatkidseat #diet #foodaroundtheworld #jamaicanculture

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2. Mexico

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Jesus, photographed in 2016 for Daily Bread. Jesus was raised by his mom, who was a teenager when she left her family and home in Michoacán, Mexico and made her way to Los Angeles. Jesus, his mom and his 2 older sisters shared a one-bedroom apartment south of downtown infested with roaches and rodents. Jesus saw little of his dad whom they discovered had another family. The only meal Jesus ate most days was dinner. His 1 hour commute to school didn’t leave time for breakfast and the school lunch was so unappetizing, a piece of fruit was all he could stomach. Mom made chicken and rice most nights. On special occasions she’d make Jesus’ favorite: tamales with red chile sauce. Growing up, Jesus was aware there were people worse off than him. He joined a student organization to feed the homeless and volunteered with @peaceoverviolence a non-profit helping victims of domestic abuse. Jesus just finished his sophomore year @harvard, with a double major of applied mathematics and psychology. Jesus has had more opportunities than he could ever have imagined, though knows there are obstacles ahead. @Erin cc2la thank you. #dailybread #whatkidseat #schoollunch #mom #successstory #proud #humbling

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3. Indigenous Brazil

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One more from Brazil. Ayme has been raised on a mostly indigenous diet. Her dad is a forest engineer and nutritionist and her mom @anaboquadi researches the culinary and medicinal uses of foods from the Cerrado – and has a great little vegan restaurant, Buriti Zen in Brasilia (for all you locals). Try the walnut cassava moqueca and cauliflower soufflé with cupuaçu cream. Ayme’s earliest memory of food is her mama’s milk. Thinking of this makes her want to return to that time and nurse again. Açaí is Ayme’s favorite food and part of her heritage; her great grandmother was an açaí merchant who sold her berries at Ver-o-peso Market in Belém. From working on Daily Bread, Ayme realized that she eats many things that other kids don’t – like lots of fresh veggies. #dailybread #powerhousebooks #plantprotein #whatkidseat #culture #kids #eatyourgreens #diet #indigenous #buriti #buritizen

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4. Posh Brazil

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At the other end of the culinary spectrum from Kawakanih, Henrico lives in a posh suburb of Brasilia and likes to invent his own snacks. Among his favorites are chocolate soufflé, anything with Nutella, “brigadeiro,” a ball of baked condensed milk and chocolate, buttered toast sprinkled with Nescau powder, a treat his uncle invented, and one of his own creations, steak covered with sliced bananas. #dailybread #powerhousebooks #whatkidseat #brazil #food #diet #cuisine #globalization

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5. Amazonian Brazil

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One place Nestle won’t reach is the Xingu National Park, a preserve in the Amazonian basin. Surrounded by cattle ranching and deforestation, the park is home to Kawakanih and her tribe, the Arawaki. Kawakanih’s daily bread is manioc, a potato-like root that’s ground into flour and used to make beiju, a sort of cassava pancake. Kawakanih wraps her beiju around fresh fish she catches in the Xingu River. “When you’re hungry,” she says, “you just go to the river with your net.” For now, anyway. #dailybread #powerhouse #whatkidseat #indigenous #diet #nutrition #xingupreserve #nobolsonaro

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6. Poor Brazil

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Thayla, Brasilia, 2018. Most poor kids in Brasil attend school to be able to eat, but the government has failed to provide adequate school lunches, offering little more than milk and crackers or canned beans. Thayla wishes she had more flavors in her diet and could afford to eat feijoada. If she had enough money, she’d buy clothes for the street kids who are worse off than her. Someday, she’d like to be a teacher. In Brazil, corporate food is finding ways to profit from the poorest consumers, reaching ever more remote places. Nestle hires micro-entrepreneurs, mom and pops who trundle thru villages with carts selling cheap processed snacks. A generation ago, Brazil’s poor were underfed. Today, 50% of the population is overweight. The UN should be focused not only at calorie intake but nutrient. #dailybread #powerhousebooks #whatkidseat #diet #nutrition #kids #brazil #schoollunch

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7. Junk Food USA

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Can you guess what percent of our calories come from vegetables in the US? Less than 1%! Looking at all of the kids’ food I photographed, not just in the US, but all over the world, greens were consistently absent. Parents often say, “My kid won’t eat vegetables.” They throw up their hands. “I put healthy food in front of them, but they only like pizza.” You can’t force kids to eat healthy foods, but if you give them the choice, they’ll choose salt, fat, and sugar over leafy greens because salt, fat, and sugar appeal to our deepest, primal cravings stretching back to our caveman days! If you don’t introduce whipped cream Frappuccinos, sautéed spinach with a little butter and salt isn’t bad. #dailybread #eatyourgreens #whatkidseat #parenting #primalcravings #diet #powerhousebooks

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8. Italy

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12 year old Amelia from Catania, Sicily, surrounded by her vibrantly colorful diet: the green of beans and zucchini, red of cherry tomatoes, yellow of peppers, purple of radicchio, orange of melon, etc. Outside of a single pizza box, there’s no packaging in Amelia’s week of meals. Everything’s homemade, which is as pleasing to the eye as it is easy on the environment! Daily Bread is a finalist for the 2018 Food Sustainability Media Award announced next week in Milan. All finalists have been put forward for the Best of the Web Award. The winner is chosen by the public. Check out finalists here: www.goodfoodmediaaward.com/finalists/2018/ #dailybread #goodfoodmediaaward #homemade #lesswaste #colorfulfood #regenerativeagriculture

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9. India

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Check out the Food Sustainability Media Award Finalists and vote for your favorite! http://www.goodfoodmediaaward.com/finalists/2018/ #goodfood #whatsonyourplate #foodsustainability #dailybread

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10. No processed foods

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Ademilson Francisco dos Santos, who traveled from Vao de Almas, a village of 200 families in the state of Goias to Brasilia for this Daily Bread shoot. Ademilson’s day is divided between school in the morning and farming in the afternoon; he helps his father harvest manihot (cassava), a staple of his simple, clean diet which is free of packaged, processed foods. Thank you @anaboquadi for helping make these pictures. #dailybread #foodculture #cerrado #cleanfood #whatkidseat #cassava

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11. Dubai

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An outtake from Daily Bread in Dubai. Sometimes mom’s hand would enter frame to adjust Yusuf’s dish-dash or lovingly tickle a little life into him. #dailybread #dubai #diet #foodculture

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12. Senegal and Mumbai

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These two portraits from Daily Bread (Meissa, Senegal and Anchal, Mumbai) were selected for inclusion in American Photography's annual collection of pictures (AP34). @american_photography_winners #dailybread #americanphotography

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13. Kuala Lumpur

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Nur Zahra Alya Nabila, Kuala Lumpur, 2017. Portraits from my Daily Bread project are available in limited edition, fine art quality prints via @openstudios.in and printed by PICTO labs. #dailybread #openstudios.in #lensculture

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14. Senegal

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Sira Sissokho, photographed in Dakar, Senegal with what she ate in a week. In 2015, Cambridge University conducted an exhaustive study, identifying countries with the healthiest diets in the world. 9 of the top 10 countries are in Africa, where fish, vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, and grains are staples and most meals are homemade. #whatkidseat #dailybread #homemade #wholefoods #diet #nutrition

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15. The photographer’s son, Hank

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Hank (my kid) with the food he ate in a week. My wife and I thought he had more green in his diet. We can do better. In the US, less than 1% of our calories come from veggies! 60% come from ultra-processed foods (ingredients you wouldn't find in your kitchen at home). #dailybread #whatkidseat #diet #nutrition #greens #processedfood

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What a wonderful project!