The whole anti-vaccination craze continues to be an issue across the world and in the United States, but one country is taking a stand against parents who decide not to give their kids crucial vaccines that fight off potentially deadly diseases.

In Germany, the parliament recently voted to make measles vaccinations for children compulsory, and parents who don’t have their children vaccinated could face a fine of up to $2,750. The law goes into effect in March 2020.

Syringe and Vaccine

Measles cases have been on the rise in both the U.S. and Europe recently. In late July of this year in the U.S., there were a reported 1,164 measles cases, the highest number in this country since 1992. A major outbreak of measles in 2014 resulted in 667 cases, so this recent explosion is quite troublesome.

The numbers in Europe are much worse. The World Health Organization reported almost 90,000 measles cases and 37 deaths across Europe in the first half of 2019. Ukraine has been hit the hardest, with 18 deaths and 54,000 cases of measles.

Smiles post vaccines!

Jens Spahn, head of the German health ministry, said, “A measles infection is an unnecessary threat in 2019. It’s about the protection of the weakest, the little ones who can not be vaccinated until the end of the first year of life.”

While there will be exceptions for children who can’t be vaccinated due to medical reasons, parents who can’t prove that their children have been vaccinated by August 1, 2021, or those who refuse to do it will be fined.

What do you think about this new law in Germany? Is it government overreach? Do you think a law like this would fly in the U.S.?

Share your thoughts with us in the comments.