Most of us are probably aware that the irritating oils from poison ivy leaves can smear onto your dog or outdoor cat, then transfer onto your skin or clothes, causing that awful, telltale itching and rash.

If you live pretty much anywhere in North America where there are woods and wooded areas, there’s a good chance you or your dog risk exposure to poison ivy, oak, and sumac. Even trace amounts can result in a rash, depending on your sensitivity to urushiol.

The sticky oil that covers the leaves, stem, and roots of the plant is called urushiol, and around 85% of people are allergic to it. 50 millions Americans experience a rash every year, and get this – just because you’ve never had a bad reaction to poison ivy before doesn’t mean you never will.

You might not be aware, though, that the irritation that goes along with exposure to poison ivy can also cause the same symptoms in your dog. Not only that, but because they don’t understand that scratching makes it worse, dogs are more likely to end up with a secondary infection.

Most of the time, your dog’s coat protects it from the oil reaching the skin, but that’s not always the case. If they come into direct contact where their coat is shorter or nonexistent, like on their belly or the insides of their legs, they could end up with an itchy rash.

What’s more, there’s a good chance your dog would spread the oil to you.

If you’ve been in the woods with your dog, you should bathe the dog (and yourself) as soon as possible after you arrive home. Make sure to wear gloves, keep the water lukewarm, and use an oatmeal or other anti-itch shampoo.

If you still notice your puppers worrying at an irritation, contact your vet – they may have you apply a cream or administer Benedryl.

You should also wash your own clothes right away, including anything you and your dog touched before your bath, like towels and bath mats, the whole nine yards.

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LEAVES OF 3, LET THEM BE 🍃😲⁠ ⁠ urushiol: pronounced 👩‍🏫 yur-oo-shee-aal⁠ ⁠ The oil that causes an allergic reaction from poison oak, ⁠ sumac or ivy⁠ ⁠ How long does could it take for poison ivy, poison sumac or poison oak rash to show up if you’ve never had one in the past❔❓⁠ ⁠ Do you know? Leave a comment below 👇🏼… what’s your guess❔❓⁠ ⁠ This oil spreads so easily that all you have to do is touch something that has the oil of the plant on it & you can be affected. ⁠ ⁠ The oil is located on every part of the plant (leaves, stem, vines, flower & roots)🍃⁠ ⁠ 💥If you mow your lawn you could easily spread the whole plant over your lawn in tiny pieces.⁠ ⁠ 💥Don't burn poison ivy, oak or sumac… the oils get in the air and can land on skin causing a rash or worse, get in the lungs &👿 cause a serious reaction.⁠ ⁠ If you come in contact with poison ivy, sumac oak take fast precautions & you may reduce the severity & even prevent the rash⁠.⁠ ⁠ Use soap & water (consider something that really cuts the oil/grease, like dish soap) & rinse thoroughly with cold water.⁠ ⁠ And lastly… the answer. ➡️ It could take up to 2-3 weeks for a rash to appear IF you've never had it and if you’ve had it before, you could see a rash in 4-48 hours.⁠ ⁠ Contact your dermatologist if you’re unsure what’s caused your rash.⁠ ⁠ ⁠ ⁠ Hamzavi Dermatology Canton⁠ call or email for a telederm or in-office appointment⁠ ✉️hcdtelederm@hamzavi.com⁠ ☎️(734) 455-8180⁠ 💻Hamzaviderm.com⁠ ⁠ ⁠ ⁠ #itch #poisonivyitches #stopitching #poisonivyplant #poisonoakleaf #hamzavidermcanton #hamzavidermatologycanton⁠

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This might seem like overkill, but as someone who has suffered with poison ivy at least once a summer, I promise that you’ll be happier spending an hour making sure everyone is clean than you will scratching your skin for a couple of weeks.

It’s all fun and games until there’s no way to scratch that itch!